Dog Obedience 1

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Destructive Chewing in Dogs…

IF YOU'RE A NEW PET PARENT STANDING THERE WONDERING WHICH WAY TO GO=> <=

Or If you’re anything like me and you want to have a happy dog, that in turn will make you happy, you need look no further, here you’ll find info and great resources for new and experienced dog owners… For the Love of Fido – Paving the Road to Dog Training Success one Treat at a Time…

Dog Obedience Training 
Dog Training -Puppy Training -How to train a dog -How to train a puppy

A lack of resources, both financial and time, is a reason that people often use for not pursuing training with their dog. There’s no excuse now. You can learn how to potty train your puppy/how to housebreak your dog with our FREE DIY dog training tutorials, and at your own pace….

But remember, starting your dog on the right foot in the beginning is key to getting your dog to conform to doing what you expect from him. Although you CAN teach an old dog new tricks, waiting until later may be more difficult for you and your dog to get things together. Puppy training is important to incorporate proper training and teaching for your dog since the beginning…

Dogs can act out in a variety of ways, including damaging things, being aggressive toward others, messing up yards, and howling and barking just for the sake of it…

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The basic need of the average dog owner (you) is to:

Know how to potty train your puppy

Train your dog to come when called

Train your dog to cease tugging at the end of the leash when out for a walk

Train your dog to stop unnecessary barking

Train your dog to refrain from jumping up on people

Train your dog to sit down and stay when told

Here are some topics that you will read about in this brief guide:

Crate Training

How To Stop Your Dog From Biting and Chewing

How To Stop Your Dog From Howling and Barking

The big secret to training success is earning your dog’s 
TRUST and RESPECT

Dogs are unique creatures. Once they get attached to you, they are attached and there’s no turning back. Dogs are extremely trusting beings attuned to their owners’ needs and they aim to please. Yes, dogs are man’s best friend for a reason. However, they have to be properly trained. It’s important that we have patience in the process. The right frame of mind, our overall demeanor, and being consistent are vital to communicate what we want them to do.

The easy way to an obedient dog is when your dog chooses to obey you! You must win your dog’s mind first for him to give in and stop challenging you! To achieve this we have to encourage them to perform desirable behaviors ‘voluntarily’ in order for them to really start to internalize those behaviors.

There is no better way to teach your dog than to teach your dog your self that’s because the bond you form with your dog is one of the most important ingredients to success! Be engaging. Teach your dog to FOCUS and think! A dog that receives plenty of mental stimulation is much less likely to engage in problem behaviors like destructive chewing and digging. Teaching your dog something new and fun (e.g. find a hidden object, retrieve a favorite toy) can provide your dog with some much-needed mental stimulation.

Training has to come from within. The more sincere you are with your dog the more likely they are to respond to you. The more real you are the faster your dog learns.

Eye contact is vital. Use the "look at me command" 
+ "heart felt communication" to teach your dog how to FOCUS 

Whenever we’re introducing a new concept to our dogs we want to do it in a less distracting environment. the first thing you need to teach your dog is how to look at you in the eye because remember if you can get your dog’s eyes you can communicate with them much easier. To get him a little motivated give him a piece of chicken for the heck of it to let him know what you’ve got something good. Next you’re going to hold the chicken up to your eyes… You’re simply saying “yes”, or “Good Boy” when he looks at you to let him know that equals ‘chicken coming to him’.

But you don’t want him ultimately looking at the chicken… Say “look at me”. You’re no longer holding a treat up to your eyes, you are using your hand (in a vertical position between your eyes) instead. You’re teaching him to look to your eyes rather than looking at something else. With a high-energy dog it’s really important to kind of pick up the pace because smart dogs are really aware of their environment and you’ve got to give them a reason to keep paying attention to you.

With consistent training this formula will help your dog internalize the desirable behavior. This is how you can become your dog’s leader!

Basic Principles of Dog Training
  • Work for only 15 minutes at a time (15 min. a day twice a day) and don’t let the lesson become monotonous. Every training session must conclude with petting, praise, and encouragement to keep up the dog’s enthusiasm for his work. Let your dog perform a short exercise that he has already learned well so that the session can be ended with a legitimate reward.
  • Repeat the same command over and over until your dog understands it. At first, hand signals should be exaggerated; as training progresses the exaggeration can be reduced.
  • Concentrate on the lesson at hand’ Let the command you’re teaching be the only word the dog hears. Always use the same word and hand signal for each command so as not to confuse the dog. Use the dog’s name when when giving commands. Let your dog master one skill before you try to teach him another.
  • It is wise to use hand signals along with voice signals from the very beginning. It will not be long before the dog learns to respond to the gesture alone, and the vocal command can be dispensed with. hand signals are used in formal obedience trials.
  • Most dogs speak the language of food! Use rewards to reinforce a positive behavior. Keep any tidbits you’re using as a reward in sight. Carry then in a pocket where you can get at them quickly. When a dog successfully executes the command (even if his performance takes more time than desirable) you should always reward him. Rewards may take the following forms: Kind words, a few minute’s romp, patting, a toy or bone, and small food treats. Then he is more likely to repeat the behavior. When a dog is rewarded for his performance, he senses that he has done the right thing and will do it more readily the next time.
  • Do not yell at your dog. Never shout or stamp your feet. Don’t lose your temper. Earn their respect. Don’t force them to respect you. Have you ever respected anyone who physically forced you to do something? Not me. Use the “time out” command instead to reinforce behavior.
  • If you cannot control yourself, you cannot control your dog. Never lose your temper or patience when you’re teaching your puppy.
  • let your dog know, by the tone of your voice, that you are displeased. A dog soon learns that a master who yells one minute and forgives the next is not to be taken seriously!
  • Do not PHYSICALLY punish your dog, nor is the dog’s name ever used when he is being corrected. Being physical with your dog, and trying to dominate your dog, is totally useless. You want your dog to learn because he loves you, not because he fears you.
  • Time outs are one of the most effective disciplinary tools for dogs!

Dog Training – Puppy Training – How to train a dog – how to train a puppy

Crate Training

Crate training is very important to your dog’s life inside your home. The crate is your dog’s den. It provides a safe, secure little “home”for your dog, a place where he can relax and chill out. Because the crate is the puppy’s own place, he will be reluctant to eliminate in it. This helps him to begin to “hold it”, a skill he’ll have to master to live inside your home.

The crate is not a prison nor is it cruel. Dogs are den animals that like small spaces for sleep and rest. A space that’s close and covered on both sides and from above is a safe place, and your puppy knows that instinctively. Crate training helps to facilitate the house-training process. Crate training is based on the knowledge that dogs do not like to soil where they eat and sleep so, puppies will try their best to wait and eliminate when they are outside of their crate.

The key to crate training is to let your dog be successful. Feed your dog in the crate for the first few days, and place him inside periodically throughout the day. this way he will come to learn that the crate is not a prison, but his very own space. Make sure he eliminates before you crate him and never leave him in his crate for too long (four hours at a time is plenty, except at night). Make sure that when you let him out of his crate you take him outside immediately.

Make the crate a happy place for your dog by providing him with treats and toys when he goes inside. He must go inside the crate voluntarily. The first day of crate training leave him inside just a few minutes. Never crate your puppy for more than 4 hours at a time and no more than 12 hours a day. Any more time than that creates a restless, unhappy puppy. Remember, the crate is NEVER punishment, nor should it be an unpleasant experience. Never toss him inside when you’re angry!

Biting Behavior

Even though biting is considered as a natural, instinctive behavior, biting could pose a serious risk to others including yourself. You may find it cute in the puppy stage, but as they grow, it’s not cute anymore.  You have to start when your dog is still a puppy to get  to change this Innate behavior.

While still in the puppy stage it is important that puppies interact with each other. Often that will include biting. If there is one puppy in the litter that is overly aggressive, the others will get after the aggressive puppy for being too rough. Eventually the aggressive puppy will learn to subside with the biting.

Here are some tips to handle the biting situation

  • Use the same word and gesture ““Uh-oh”, “No”, or “ouch” to let the puppy know that it hurt you. Eventually your dog will realize biting is not a desirable behavior.
  • Let the puppy know that you hurt when he bites you. In a firm voice say “No” or “ouch”, but there should be no yelling. Slowly, not abruptly, take your hand away.
  • If he bites you again, repeat your verbal reaction. Step away from the puppy for a while. The puppy will realize that you don’t appreciate that behavior and will figure out that you don’t want to be around him because of it.
  • Reward the puppy when he is good and not biting you. Give your puppy a toy to chew on. Remember to use lots and lots of praise in a happy excited tone of voice when your dog does something you like and want him to repeat.
  • Be consistent when you are training our puppy to stop biting. Continue to let the puppy know that bites are not acceptable. Timing is everything. The correction must always be while the dog is misbehaving.
  • Your puppy will learn about limits with humans and other animals. That way he can interact in a positive way with other dogs/ animals as he gets older.
  • Keep young children out of harm’s way by not leaving them alone with the puppy. The puppy may still be in the learning stage and may bite the child. Or the child may harm the puppy.
  • If your dog continues to bite despite your best efforts, contact your veterinarian or a dog trainer for assistance.
Destructive Chewing in Dogs

Chewing is a perfectly normal behavior for dogs of all ages. This activity keeps their jaws strong and their teeth clean. Both wild and domestic dogs spend hours chewing bones. Chewing and mouthing are natural, innate canine behaviors but they should be controlled and channeled into something appropriate. If you notice that your dog has problems with chewing, you will need to correct the problem as soon as you notice it. There are some dogs that will chew anything that they can get their teeth on.  That includes shoes, clothes and furniture.  Don’t let him chew on something of no value, like that old shoe that you were going to throw out anyway. Laugh now and you’ll be crying later on when he ruins a brand new pair of shoes. This can lead only to a confused, undisciplined puppy.

One of the easiest solutions to this issue is to get your dog a variety of dog toys that they can chew on. Giving him some edible things to chew, like bully sticks, pig ears, rawhide bones, pig skin rolls, Dentastix®, Dentabones® ,Nylabone® Healthy Edibles® or a kong® Using these toys can teach them what they can chew on and what they cannot.  Plus, having a variety of dog toys for them to chew on will keep them occupied. Chewing on the toys will also keep their teeth and gums healthy.

Use caution: Only give your dog natural raw bones like chicken necks/turkey necks or bones that are sold specifically for chewing. Do not give him cooked bones, like leftover t-bones or chicken wings, as these can splinter and seriously injure your dog. If you see him licking or chewing an item he shouldn’t, say “Uh-oh,” or “No” and remove the item from your dog’s mouth, then replace it with a dog toy or something that he CAN chew.

Consistently encourage your dog to play with his toys. Approval or disapproval of whatever he is chewing on can be shown in your voice. Reward him for doing the right thing and reinforce with the phrase “Good boy/girl”. Or correct him with an emphatic “No!” accompanied by a loud noise, such as clapping your hands, that should do the trick.  While you are training him, It is also important that the area is kept free of clutter.  For your part, make sure that there are no shoes or other items that can provoke them to start chewing on them. “Puppy-proof” your house. Put valuable objects away until you’re confident that your dog’s chewing behavior is restricted to appropriate items. Make it easy for your dog to succeed.

Discourage chewing inappropriate items by spraying them with chewing deterrents. You can also apply a little chili powder or other non-toxic substance. When you first use a deterrent, apply a small amount to a piece of tissue and gently place it directly in your dog’s mouth. Allow him to taste it and then spit it out. Dogs need to learn what they can chew as well as what they can’t chew. Check out Using Taste Deterrents.

Whining, Howling And Excessive Barking

Some dogs are more vocal than others. Sporadic whining, howling, growling and barking is a normal canine innate behavior and will usually fade as a dog grows. Dogs bark/ whine and vocalize for different reasons. Picture this: It’s your new puppy first night away from his mother and siblings. Everything is new and strange. He’s lost and trying to let his mother know where he is, not realizing she can’t hear him… Whining is his only way of communication! The puppy will be homesick and quite likely to cry!

Comfort him of course but, try not to overdo the comforting bit. It gives the puppy the idea that he has only to make noises to gain attention. Better to wait for a period of silence and then praise him ardently for being a good dog – for being quiet!

Just before the pup is put to bed give him some strenuous exercise to tire him out, and then a small dish of warm milk. Remember that at its worst, night crying never lasts more than a few nights. The puppy stops by himself. With your patience and reassurance, your puppy should adjust to his new home very quickly.

Thereafter, if you have a dog that constantly whines, howls or barks, it can become a problem.  Not only can it become a problem for you, if you live in an apartment or a subdivision it can also become a problem for your neighbors. You would get constant complaints from them if the problem is not resolved.

It is important to note that some dogs are born barkers. It’s in their genes to be very vocal. However there’s hope of change, especially with consistent basic obedience training. Here are some ways that you can deal with a dog that is constantly creating havoc:

  • Find out why the dog is whining, howling or barking so much.  They may be hungry, thirsty or both. Make sure that the dog is always fed and always has water.  Don’t forget about supplying the dog with toys so that they can stay busy.
  • Sometimes a dog will make noises because he needs to go potty (pee or poop). Usually after he eats, after an activity and after a nap or when he’s waking up in the morning.  There will be other times, but once the dog gets trained, you will be able to figure it all out. A regular feeding and water schedule will make it easier to predict when your puppy needs to go outside.
  • After you have provided food, water and toys for the dog, they should be quiet. However, if they are not, don’t be afraid to let them know that their behavior is not acceptable (correct them but do not punish them). Dogs that are repeatedly punished for growling eventually may not give a warning and immediately escalate to biting.
  • Some dogs do not like being by themselves. They get upset when no one is around and it creates anxiety for them.  In addition to being lonely, they get stressed out and starting making all kinds of annoying noises.
  • Dogs need to learn how to be alone.  Even if you are at home with the dog, don’t make it a habit of always catering to them when they whine.  If you do, they will expect you to come every time.  You’ll have a difficult time breaking the habit.
  • As your puppy gets older and grows into a dog, he needs lots of physical activity and fresh air.  He needs regular exercise, like walks and playing fetch. Keep him on a schedule with his physical activities. A well exercised dog is more likely to sleep the day away while you are gone.

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 For the Love of Fido – Paving the Road to Dog Training Success

one Treat at a Time

Dog Training – Puppy Training – How to train a dog – how to train a puppy

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